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Comparing New deal Square deal and the New Society 2016-09-12 오전 12:35:00

Throughout the 20th century, legislation helping middle class people from being taken advantage of from monopolies, creating better civil rights for blacks, and protecting the consumer from adulterated products, were created under the policies of Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, and Lyndon Johnson. Although these domestic plans all had different problems to solve, all 3 were similar in that they were created to help the american people, especially the working class. .
    Parts of TR’s deal can be seen in both FDR’s New deal and LBJ’s Great society. TR was a strong advocate for the Progressive Movement. He fought to elevate the well being of the middle class by passing legislation protecting them from adulterated products. As seen in the Pure Food & Drug act, and Meat Inspection act. He also destroyed trusts with the Sherman Anti-trust act. Not only did he help economically, but he also fought to protect wildlife, creating over 150 million acres of national forest and established 5 national parks. FDR’s New plan shows similarities in that it helped the middle class during america's greatest economic slump. By once again legalizing alcohol and paying farmers to leave their farms to reduce surplus and inflation, FDR was able to restabilize the economy create jobs for the 25% of unemployed americans. Lyndon B Johnson’s Great Society, despite not focused on economics, did have some qualities similar to the two plans previously mentioned. LBJ conserved 9.1 million acres of forest from industrialisation. He increased the standard for consumer products and focused heavily on the middle class. Legislation such as Highway Safety Act, the Public Broadcasting Act protected everyday americans from everything from false advertisement to speeding cars. All three plans helped the middle class during their respective time frames.
TR’s Square deal and FDR’s New deal were more closely related to each other than compared to LBJ’s Great society. The deals were more aimed at helping america economically, one to help consumer protection and destroy corrupt monopolies. And the other was to help banks get out of bankruptcy and put money back into the hands of the people after the Great Depression. Both encouraged unionization and worker rights, while slowly putting money into the middle class. LBJ’s Great Society was more geared toward race relations and civil rights. After the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Johnson stepped in and completed JFK’s agenda of equality for blacks.  LBJ banned the literacy test, all jim crow laws, and discrimination against any new immigrants based on ethnicity. His legislations fixed social issues rather than economic ones.
Out of the Three deals, some may argue that the most successful one was TR’s Square Deal. Although one can argue that FDR brought America out of the Great Depression, or LBJ created civil rights that we can see today. TR’s Legacy can still be seen in his numerous national parks, the absence of monopolies, and the increased safety and rights that workers now have. TR also gave the most power to the Federal government. Through legislation such as the Sherman Antitrust act and the Hepburn act, the federal government now has weapons to combat the corruption of companies if the problem ever arises. Not only did TR increase domestic well being, he also was the first president to step onto the world stage and propel america to a world superpower. Apart of his Square Deal was the “Big Stick Policy” which gave america the power to act as a policemen in Latin America and Europe. His foreign policy earned him a Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating the Russo-Sino war, he also accomplished america's greatest infrastructural achievement, the Panama Canal, of the 20th century. TR not only addressed domestic problems, but at the same time, he increased america's foreign presence and it’s climb to a “A-List” world power.
    Teddy Roosevelt’s Square Deal, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal, and Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society were all great presidential feats in the 20th century. Each plan helped the middle class overcome the struggles of their time period, whether it was civil rights or economic struggle. They had many similarities that each plan was aimed to helping the middle class, however their differences lie in what each plan tried to solve. Nonetheless, each deal was unique in it’s own way of helping the american public and the struggles of their time period.

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2018-08-24 오전 11:34:27
  Throughout the 20th century, legislation helping middle-class people from being taken advantage of the monopolies, creating better civil rights for blacks, and protecting the consumer from adulterated products, was created under the policies of Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, and Lyndon Johnson. Although these domestic plans all had different problems to solve, all three were similar in that they were created to help the American people, especially the working class.
Parts of TR’s deal can be seen in both FDR’s New deal and LBJ’s Great Society. TR was a strong advocate for the Progressive Movement. He fought to elevate the well-being of the middle class by passing legislation protecting them from adulterated products. As seen in the Pure Food & Drug Act, and the Federal Meat Inspection Act. He also destroyed trusts with the Sherman Antitrust Act. Not only did he help economically, but he also fought to protect wildlife, creating over 150 million acres of national forest and established five national parks. FDR’s new plan shows similarities in that it helped the middle class during the American greatest economic slump. By once again legalizing alcohol and paying farmers to leave their farms to reduce surplus and inflation, FDR was able to restabilize the economy create jobs for the 25 of unemployed Americans. Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society, despite not focused on economics, did have some qualities similar to the two plans previously mentioned. LBJ conserved 9.1 million acres of forest from industrialization. He increased the standard for consumer products and focused heavily on the middle class. Legislation such as the Highway Safety Act, the Public Broadcasting Act protected everyday Americans from everything from false advertisement to speeding cars. All three plans helped the middle class during their respective time frames.
TR’s Square deal and FDR’s New deal were more closely related to each other than compared to LBJ’s Great Society. The deals were more aimed at helping America economically, one to help consumer protection and destroy corrupt monopolies. And the other was to help banks get out of bankruptcy and put money back into the hands of the people after the Great Depression. Both encouraged unionization and workers' rights, while slowly putting money into the middle class. LBJ’s Great Society was more geared toward race relations and civil rights. After the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Johnson stepped in and completed JFK’s agenda of equality for blacks. LBJ banned the literacy test, all Jim Crow laws, and discrimination against new immigrants based on ethnicity. His legislation fixed social issues rather than economic ones.
Out of the three deals, some may argue that the most successful one was TR’s Square Deal. Although one can argue that FDR brought America out of the Great Depression or LBJ created civil rights that we can see today. TR’s Legacy can still be seen in his numerous national parks, the absence of monopolies, and the increased safety and rights that workers now have. TR also gave most of the power to the Federal government. Through legislation such as the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Hepburn Act, the federal government now has weapons to combat the corruption of companies if the problem ever arises. Not only did TR increase domestic well-being, he also was the first president to step onto the world stage and propel America to a world superpower. Apart of his Square Deal was the “Big Stick Policy” which gave America the power to act as a policeman in Latin America and Europe. His foreign policy earned him a Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating the Russo-Sino war he also accomplished America's greatest infrastructural achievement, the Panama Canal, of the 20th century. TR not only addressed domestic problems but at the same time, he increased America's foreign presence and its climb to an “A-List” world power.
Teddy Roosevelt’s Square Deal, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal, and Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society were all great presidential feats in the 20th century. Each plan helped the middle class overcome the struggles of their time period, whether it was civil rights or economic struggle. They had many similarities that each plan was aimed at helping the middle class, however, their differences lie in what each plan tried to solve. Nonetheless, each deal was unique in its own way of helping the American public and the struggles of their time period.
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